Text
Photo

'Breaking Bad' Remake 'Metastasis': Meet Walter Blanco
Scott Roxborough , hollywoodreporter.com

As Vince Gilligan’s creation ends with record U.S. ratings, Sony TV preps a Colombian version — but no RV this time.

Meet Wal­ter Blan­co. He’s the flawed lead char­ac­ter in Metas­ta­sis, a new Colom­ …

Trippy….. They’re making Breaking Bad for Univision

Photo

Collaborating with a 4-year Old
By busymockingbird on August 27, 2013, busymockingbird.com

One day, while my daugh­ter was hap­pi­ly dis­tract­ed in her own mark­er draw­ings, I decid­ed to risk pulling out a new sketch­book I had spe­cial ordered. It had dark paper, and was per­fect for ad …

This is adorable.

Photo Set

An electrifying show by tUnE-yArDs and St. Vincent. Highlight of the night was St. Vincent’s gutsy turn at crowd surfing. Because she’s feather-light, she was getting tossed around and was doing somersaults at one point (all while singing Krokodil, on key!). Somehow, I ended up in the middle of this insanity. A night to remember!

See pictures of tUnE-yArDs and more pictures of St. Vincent here.

Source: plus.google.com
Text

Nineteenth-century London — that grimy, Industrial Age time — is frequently dreamed up in novels and films as a place of chimney smoke and dark alleys, rogues and street urchins. In short, it’s a dog-eat-dog world. This is literalized in the BareStage Productions’ “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street,” which opened this past Friday on campus.

The pervasive corruption in 1846 London drives characters mad, in “Sweeney Todd.” As the titular barber (Alex Bonte with rich baritone and morose portent) declared by the end of the first act, his throat-slitting atrocities merely reflect the inhumanity of society: “It’s man devouring man, my dear, and who are we to deny it in here?”

Murder and cannibalism are dishes best served dark and dreary, and BareStage Productions, an on-campus student-run theater group, thoughtfully crafted a performance faithful to the musical’s grungy vision. It’s to the detriment of the production, however, that the show was frequently hampered by awkward staging in the spatial confines of the Cesar Chavez Student Center.

Continue reading at DailyCal.org

Deanne Chen/Staff

Derek Ramsberg/Image

Source: dailycal.org
Text

“What do you see?,” grunted an artist in paint-splattered clothing. The question, repeated several times in the first moments of Berkeley Repertory Theatre’s “Red,” was directed to his young assistant. There’s clearly an imbalance in the dynamic. The older man’s severe glasses channeled the sheer force of his personality, whereas the younger man’s face was soft and dewy. While the grizzled elder tucked his shirt in half-way, the youth was dressed in his Sunday best suit for the first day of work — embarrassingly out-of-place in the messy studio.

At the center of “Red,” a two-character play on the philosophy and creative process of the Abstract Expressionist Mark Rothko, is a fraught teacher-student relationship. Rothko, played by David Chandler, is at once an egotistical bully and a master artist of towering fame and influence. His assistant Ken (John Brummer), who is fictional and has no historical counterpart, is an aspiring artist. Ken spends most of the play’s duration on the periphery, buffeted by the storms raised by Rothko’s grandiose personality.

Continue reading at DailyCal.org

Staff/Deanne Chen

Image/Courtesy of Kevin Berne

Source: dailycal.org
Text

Melissa Hillman likes to wear many hats: artistic director of Impact Theatre, teacher with a dramatic arts PhD from Cal and self-proclaimed nerd. Above all, Hillman is also a mother. Not that her responsibility to her sons overrides everything, but she approaches all roles with the maternal instinct to help others grow. On the timeline of her motherhood, Hillman mused, “Impact was my first baby, and then I had my second baby after that in 1998 … So I had Jacob, Jonah and Impact Theatre. Those are my babies.”

After spending twelve years at Impact Theatre, which performs at La Val’s Subterranean in North Berkeley, Hillman is nothing less than the small, nonprofit theater company’s matriarch. Impact Theatre began in 1996 at Au Coquelet Cafe (auspiciously, where your correspondent met with Hillman), with the group founded by Josh Costello as artistic director and Hillman as the associate. Hillman identified that at the time, there lacked a “space for emerging playwrights who weren’t getting a lot of play on the national scene, but were speaking honestly about the lives of younger Americans.” From the start, Impact’s mission was to create productions that resonate with younger audiences, insisting on low ticket prices and encouraging new artists.

Over time, with Hillman’s cultivation, Impact has fostered a reputation for revamping Shakepeare plays with bold interpretations targeting the “under 40, ethnically diverse, GLBT” Bay Area audience. While most non-English lit and theater majors probably regard Shakespeare as obscure high-culture, Hillman makes her adaptations accessible: “We love Shakespeare. It’s done in a boring way a lot, and we wanted people to see that it’s not boring — that it’s awesome.”

Read more at DailyCal.org

Photo/Cheshire Isaacs

Staff/Deanne Chen

Source: dailycal.org
Text

(Image source: courtesy of Kevin Berne)

Berkeley Repertory Theatre went topsy-turvy last Wednesday for the opening night of “A Doctor in Spite of Himself,” an adaptation of Moliere’s buoyant comedy co-produced by Yale Repertory Theatre. Colorful lights and a live tuba and accordion set a carnival atmosphere. The curtain rose, and a Punch-and-Judy puppet show seamlessly transitioned into a real-life squabbling husband and wife. The husband’s oversized pants and too-small blazer would have made Charlie Chaplin proud. But the real scene-stealer was the wife’s oversized breasts, lewdly wobbling around like giant bean bags.

The production’s frothy blend of screwball absurdity and raunchiness is a sugary delight, a confection that avoids being too sweet or silly, with pitch-perfect attention to comic rhythm. Based on the commedia dell’arte style, the 16th-century Italian tradition of stock characters, the adaptation was also a modern update on the anarchic slapstick found in Marx Brothers films.

Read more at The Daily Cal.

Deanne Chen/Staff

Photo

designdesk:

“GOP Super Bowl 2012”
Editorial Cartoon: Deanne Chen/Staff

Source: dailycal.org
Text

A trip to the moon is nothing new for Air, the French electronica duo. For over a decade, Nicolas Godin and Jean-Benoit Dunckel have immersed their music in retro Moog synthesizers and galactic themes (prior singles include “Kelly Watch the Stars” and “Surfing on a Rocket”) like a pair of dreamy astronomy enthusiasts. It’s perfect, then, that Air was commissioned to compose a modern soundtrack for the full-color restoration of Georges Melies’ “Le Voyage Dans la Lune” (1902), a pioneering artwork widely considered to be the first science fiction movie.

The crowning attraction of Air’s seventh album, titled after Melies’ film, is inevitably its connection to a work of incredible historical importance (see Martin Scorsese’s recent film, “Hugo”, for full emotional nostalgia), rather than its independent merits. In general, the best film soundtracks must both complimentary and absorbing: lifting a film’s mood without overriding its storyline. Luckily, Air is up to the challenge, as revealed by their mastery of featherlight ambiance of captivating beauty in past film soundtracks for “The Virgin Suicides” and “Lost in Translation.”

The album’s single, “Seven Stars,” builds the anticipation of a rocket launch with rumbling drums and Victoria Legrand’s (of Beach House) swooning vocals — surely an ode to Melies’ famous still of the Moon’s face with a rocket crashed in its eye. The same breathless exploration permeates through “Cosmic Trip,” a meteor shower of crystalline blips. However, aside from other bright stars like these, half of the album is dimmed by lackluster transitions better for cinematic portent than compelling listening.

At best, Air’s symphonic space-pop is a fascinating alliance with Melies’ 110-year-old vision, a mind-bending alignment of past and present with futuristic imagination. But it’s slightly disappointing that it’s all the album will ever be: A specialty curio that supports, not transcends, Melies’ greater masterwork.

Read more and listen to the podcast review at The Daily Cal.

Image: Courtesy of EMI

Staff/Deanne Chen

Source: dailycal.org